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Lauric acid is a particular type of fatty acid found in saturated-fat foods. The single best source of lauric acid is coconuts, and in fact many of the benefits of coconut oil that have been well-established in research settings are due to the presence of lauric acid.




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While lauric acid itself has disease-fighting abilities, monolaurin from lauric acid is even more capable of inhibiting the growth of pathogens due to having strong antimicrobial and antibacterial properties. For this reason, for centuries foods containing lauric acid like coconuts have been used for treating viral infections, including influenza (the flu), yeast infections, the common cold, fevers, cold sores and genital herpes.


Study after study shows the impressive immune-enhancing effects that lauric acid is capable of producing in the human body. Among 30 different fatty acids studied for their antibactericidal properties, lauric acid came out as number one! Data from a study published in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy Journal indicate that C12 (lauric acid) is the most inhibitory saturated fatty-acid against harmful organisms.


When lauric acid is converted to monolaurin, it essentially acts like a bacteria-killer. It has the ability to kill a wide range of harmful pathogen hosts in the body, making it an effective way to help treat or prevent infections, viruses, digestive disorders and chronic diseases.


Other uses for lauric acid include controlling infections like bronchitis, Candida virus, sexually transmitted diseases like gonorrhea, genital warts caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) or chlamydia, and intestinal infections caused by parasites.


The strong bactericidal properties of lauric acid can be used to effectively and naturally treat acne. Studies have demonstrated that lauric acid works as an antibiotic treatment method against Propionibacterium bacteria that causes acne breakouts on the skin. This bacteria promotes follicular inflammation (inflammatory acne), especially when other skin bacteria are present including P. acnes, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), and Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis).


As a saturated fat, lauric acid is insoluble in water and shelf-stable. This is one reason that coconut oil is sometimes highly modified and added to things like natural skin care products, food products and animal feeds to stabilize their texture and appearance. Industrial uses for lauric acid and its derivatives include making soaps, lotions, wetting agents, rubbers, softeners, detergents and insecticides. While this type of refined coconut oil loses most of its benefits, unmodified lauric acid can help prevent rancidity and extend shelf life of perishable foods.


Other natural sources of lauric acid include milk fat and butter from grass-fed animals, including cows, sheep or goats. These have about 3 percent lauric acid, which you can see is substantially less than coconuts and palm oil provide.


Finally, some newly genetically engineered oils including canola or rapeseed can provide up to 36 percent lauric acid, but these come with risks of their own. Refined oils that are highly processed and engineered are usually made using chemical solvents and toxins. For this reason, and because it offers many additional benefits, coconut oil is a much more natural and beneficial way to get lauric acid.


Coconut oil is 100% fat, 80-90% of which is saturated fat. This gives it a firm texture at cold or room temperatures. Fat is made up of smaller molecules called fatty acids, and there are several types of saturated fatty acids in coconut oil. The predominant type is lauric acid (47%), with myristic and palmitic acids present in smaller amounts, which have been shown in research to raise harmful LDL levels. Also present in trace amounts are monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats.


Lauric acid (LA) has been implicated in the prevention/treatment of obesity. However, the role of LA in modulating an obesity-related female reproductive disorder remains largely unknown. Here, female mice were fed a control diet, high-fat diet (HFD), or HFD supplemented with 1% LA. The results demonstrated that the HFD-induced estrous cycle irregularity and the reduction of serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) were alleviated by LA supplementation. In possible mechanisms, LA supplementation led to significant increase in serum lipid metabolites such as sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine containing LA (C12:0) and the improvement of glucose metabolism in mice fed HFD. Moreover, impaired body energy metabolism and weakened brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis of HFD-fed mice were improved by LA supplementation. Together, these findings showed that LA supplementation alleviated HFD-induced estrous cycle irregularity, possibly associated with altered serum lipid metabolites, improved glucose metabolism, body energy metabolism, and BAT thermogenesis. These findings suggested the potential application of LA in alleviating obesity and its related reproductive disorders.


Plus, while other heart-healthy fats like olive oil, canola oil, or omega-3 fatty acids in nuts and seafood have been supported by a large body of evidence, coconut oil's supposed benefits still haven't been proved in large-scale human research.


The argument: Eating fish may lower your risk of dying of heart disease thanks to the unsaturated fatty acids in seafood, which may reduce inflammation and lower levels of blood fats called triglycerides. But if you don't eat fish regularly (or at all), reaching for an omega-3 or fish oil supplement seems like a good shortcut.


The reality: A major review of studies including nearly 80,000 patients found no link between omega-3 supplements and heart disease. The takeaway: While supplements probably aren't harmful, you may be better off getting your omega-3s from your diet, rather than from a bottle.


SR Organic MCT Oil is derived exclusively from organic coconuts without the use of chemicals or hexane. Packed with energy-dense fatty acids, Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCTs) are quickly digested, absorbed and converted into ketone bodies, which are used as fuel for the brain and body in individuals following a ketogenic, low-carb lifestyle.* SR Organic MCT Oil is composed of Caprylic (C8), Capric (C10) & Lauric (C12) fatty acids and can easily be added to any food or drink without altering taste.


Carefully extracted using a patented process without the use of Hexane or other unwelcome solvents, our keto MCT oil provides three types of Caprylic Acid, known to be more efficient than traditional MCT oils. We believe in using only the best ingredients so you can have total peace of mind about the supplements you are taking. Feel the Sports Research difference!


MCT C8, C10, and C12 are body and brain boosting fatty acids that are extracted from organic coconut oil. Our MCT oil C8 Caprylic Acid, C10 Capric Acid, and C12 Lauric Acid is quickly digested, absorbed and converted into ketones more efficiently than traditional MCT coconut oil capsules. Our U.S.D.A. organic MCT coconut oil is easily digested to provide you with the fuel your brain and body needs!


Say hello to your new daily ritual! Load up on C8, C10, and C12 by mixing our coconut oil MCT into your morning coffee, tea, or smoothie formulas. Our coconut MCT oil is an easy way to add these fatty acids to your food or drink and fuel your day. Combine our MCT Oil with our Collagen Peptides in your coffee for the perfect complement of protein & fat to your diet.


Additionally, coconut oil doesn't provide the daily fat requirements your dog needs. The acids in MCTs don't have enough omega-6 and omega-3 acids, and what it does contain isn't processed very efficiently. As for claims that MCTs protect against bacteria, viruses, and fungi, while the lauric acid in MCTs does kill germs in lab tests, there is no clear evidence that it can be used in great enough quantities to offer dogs much protection.


LauricidinTechnical information on Lauricidin (monolaurin) for the Health ProfessionalThe antiviral, antibacterial, and antiprotozoal properties of lauric acid and monolaurin have been recognized for nearly three decades by only a small number of researchers: their work, however, has resulted in 50 or more research papers an numerous U.S. and foreign patents. Prof. Dr. Jon J. Kabara performed the original seminal research in this area of fat research. Kabara (1968) first patented certain fatty acids (FAs) and their derivatives (e.g., monoglycerides (MGs) can have adverse effects on various microorganisms. While nontoxic and approved as a direct food additive by the FDA, monolaurin adversely affects bacteria, yeast, fungi, and enveloped viruses.Kabara found that the properties that determine the anti-infective action of lipids are related to their structure: e.g., free fatty acids & monoglycerides. The monoglycerides are active; diglycerides and triglycerides are inactive. Of the saturated fatty acids, lauric acid has greater antiviral activity than either caprylic acid (C-8), capric acid (C-10), or myristic acid (C-14).Fatty acids and monoglycerides produce their killing/inactivating effects by several mechanisms. An early postulated mechanism was the perturbing of the plasma membrane lipid bilayer. The antiviral action attributed to monolaurin is that of fluidizing the lipids and phospholipids in the envelope of the virus, causing the disintegration of the microbial membrane. More recent studies indicate that one antimicrobial effect in bacteria is related to monolaurin's interference with signal transduction/toxin formation (Projan et al 1994). Another antimicrobial effect in viruses is due to lauric acid's interference with virus assembly and viral maturation (Hornung et al 1994). The third mode of action may be on the immune system itself (Witcher et al, 1993).Hierholzer and Kabara (1982) first reported the antiviral activity of the monoglyceride of lauric acid (monolaurin) on viruses that affect humans.. They showed virucidal effects of monolaurin on enveloped RNA and DNA viruses. This work was done at the Center for Disease Control of the U.S. Public Health Service. This study was carried out using selected virus prototypes or recognized representative strains of enveloped human viruses. All these viruses have a lipid membrane. The presence of a lipid membrane on viruses makes them especially vulnerable to lauric acid and its derivative monolaurin. These initial findings have been confirmed by many other studies.Research has shown that enveloped viruses are inactivated by added fatty acids and monoglycerides in both human and bovine milk (Isaacs et al 1991). Others (Isaacs et al 1986, 1990, 1991, 1992; Thormar et al 1987) have confirmed Kabara's original statements concerning the effectiveness of monolaurin.Some of the viruses inactivated by these lipids are the measles virus, herpes simplex virus (HSV-1 and -2), herpes family members (HIV, hepatitis C, vesicular, stomatitis virus (VSV), visna virus, and cytomegalovirus (CMV). Many of the pathogenic organisms reported to be inactivated by these antimicrobial lipids are those know to be responsible for opportunistic infections in HIV -positive individuals. For example, concurrent infection with cytomegalovirus is recognized as a serious complication for HIV positive individuals (Macallan et al 1993).Thus, it would appear imperative to investigate the practical aspects and the potential benefit of a nutritional supplement such as monolaurin (Lauricidin) for microbial infected individuals. Until now few nutritionists in mainstream nutrition community seem to have recognized the added benefit of antimicrobial lipids in the support of infected patients. These antimicrobial fatty acids and their derivatives are essentially nontoxic to man. According to the published research, lauric acid is one of the best "inactivating" fatty acids, and its monoglyceride is even more effective than the fatty acid alone (Kabara 1978, Sands et al 1978, Fletcher et al 1985, Kabara 1985).It should be emphasized that lauric acid cannot be taken orally because it is severally irritating. Lauricidin on the other hand, a derivative of lauric acid chemically bonded to glycerol to form monolaurin, can be taken orally without any problem.The lipid-coated (envelope) viruses, bacteria and other microorganisms are dependent on host lipids for their lipid constituents. The variability of fatty acids in the foods of individuals as well as the variability from de novo synthesis accounts for the variability of fatty acids in their membranes.Monolaurin does not appear to have an adverse effect on desirable gut bacteria, but rather on only potentially pathogenic microorganisms. For example, Isaacs et al (1991) reported no inactivation of the common Esherichiacoli or Salmonella enteritidis by monolaurin, but major inactivation of Hemophilus influenza, Staphylococcus epidermis and Group B gram positive streptococcus.The potentially pathogenic bacteria inactivated by monolaurin include Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Groups A, streptococci-gram-positive organisms, and some gram-negative organisms (Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Helicobacter pylori).Decreased growth of Staphylococcus aureus and decreased production of toxic shock syndrome toxin-l was shown with monolaurin (Holland et al 1994). Monolaurin was 5000 times more inhibitory against Listeria monocytogenes than ethanol (Oh & Marshall 1993). In vitro monolaurin rapidly inactivate Helicobacter pylori. Of greater significance there appears to be very little development of resistance of the organism to the bactericidal effects (Petschow et al 1996) of these natural antimicrobials.A number of fungi, yeast, and protozoa are also inactivated or killed by monolaurin. The fungi include several species of ringworm (Isaacs et al 1991). The yeast reported to be affected is Candida albicans (Isaacs et al 1991) The protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia is killed by monoglycerides from hydrolyzed human milk (Hemell et al 1986, Reiner et al 1986, Crouch et al 1991, Isaacs et al 1991).Chlamydia trachomatis is inactivated by monolaurin (Bergsson et al 1998). Hydrogels containing monocaprin/monolaurin are potent in vitro inactivators of sexually transmitted viruses such as HSV-2 and HIV-1 and bacteria such as Neisserian gonorrhea (Thormar 1999).Read more: =13#ixzz1kmYL9F9Z 041b061a72


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